Dominican Republic
Military troops and immigration agents in the Dominican Republic have intensified operations against undocumented Haitians in recent weeks. Photo from Dominican Today.

In a campaign to expel undocumented Haitians, the Dominican Republic has been delaying, detaining or questioning darker-skinned U.S. citizens, the U.S. State Department said. 

In a warning to travelers issued November 19, the State Department said Dominican migration agents have targeted those believed to be undocumented migrants as they look particularly for people of Haitian descent. Dominican officials do not always respect travelers’ legal status in the Dominican Republic or nationality, according to the Dominican media.

“These actions may lead to increased interaction with Dominican authorities, especially for darker skinned U.S. citizens and U.S. citizens of African descent,” said the State Department alert. “There are reports that detainees are kept in overcrowded detention centers, without the ability to challenge their detention, and without access to food or restroom facilities, sometimes for days at a time, before being released or deported to Haiti.”

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In a campaign to expel undocumented Haitians, the Dominican Republic has been delaying, detaining or questioning darker-skinned U.S. citizens, the U.S. State Department said. 

In a warning to travelers issued November 19, the State Department said Dominican migration agents have targeted those believed to be undocumented migrants as they look particularly for people of Haitian descent. Dominican officials do not always respect travelers’ legal status in the Dominican Republic or nationality, according to the Dominican media.

“These actions may lead to increased interaction with Dominican authorities, especially for darker skinned U.S. citizens and U.S. citizens of African descent,” said the State Department alert. “There are reports that detainees are kept in overcrowded detention centers, without the ability to challenge their detention, and without access to food or restroom facilities, sometimes for days at a time, before being released or deported to Haiti.”

To access this post, you must purchase Haitian Times' Subscription, Billed Yearly or Weekly Pass.

J.O. Haselhoef is the author of “Give & Take: Doing Our Damnedest NOT to be Another Charity in Haiti.” She co-founded "Yonn Ede Lot" (One Helping Another), a nonprofit that partnered with volunteer groups in La Montagne ("Lamontay"), Haiti from 2007-2013. She writes and lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.