haiti earthquake 2010, planes in haiti, help for haiti
Groups wait on the tarmac in the days after the 2010 earthquake.

By Garry Pierre-Pierre

When the earthquake flattened Haiti in 2010, a troop of young Haitian Americans descended on their homeland with the noble mission of sharing their expertise. They were lawyers, doctors, entrepreneurs and others filled with altruism willing to lend a hand in the rebuilding process. 

In the few years that followed, almost all of them had left Haiti. They left deeply disappointed that their knowledge was unappreciated or met with hostility from their sisters and brothers, who viewed them suspiciously. 

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By Garry Pierre-Pierre

When the earthquake flattened Haiti in 2010, a troop of young Haitian Americans descended on their homeland with the noble mission of sharing their expertise. They were lawyers, doctors, entrepreneurs and others filled with altruism willing to lend a hand in the rebuilding process. 

In the few years that followed, almost all of them had left Haiti. They left deeply disappointed that their knowledge was unappreciated or met with hostility from their sisters and brothers, who viewed them suspiciously. 

To access this post, you must purchase Haitian Times' Subscription, Billed Yearly or Weekly Pass.

Garry Pierre-Pierre is a Pulitzer-prize winning, multimedia and entrepreneurial journalist. In 1999, he left the New York Times to launch the Haitian Times, a New York-based English-language publication serving the Haitian Diaspora. He is also the co-founder of the City University Graduate School of Journalism‘s Center for Community and Ethnic Media and a senior producer at CUNY TV.