• Haitians in Mexico

As the United States stepped up Haitian repatriation in recent weeks, several Latin American and Caribbean countries with significant Haitian populations have also been sending Haitians back home, according to multiple migration organizations. Cuba, Mexico and the Bahamas, which say they have seen a surge of Haitians, are among the countries sending back the largest numbers.

In total, an estimated 8,935 Haitians have been returned from countries in the Latin America and Caribbean region since Sept. 19. Among them are children and unaccompanied minors, according to UNICEF, the United Nations division that aims to protect children worldwide. 

The returns — a mix of both repatriations and deportations — are sure to create additional stress on a country already dealing with multiple social, economic and political crises. Turmoil exacerbated by the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, an earthquake in August that impacted about 800,000 people in the southwest region and ongoing gang activity that has left hundreds dead and 20,000 displaced in the Port-au-Prince area alone.

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As the United States stepped up Haitian repatriation in recent weeks, several Latin American and Caribbean countries with significant Haitian populations have also been sending Haitians back home, according to multiple migration organizations. Cuba, Mexico and the Bahamas, which say they have seen a surge of Haitians, are among the countries sending back the largest numbers.

In total, an estimated 8,935 Haitians have been returned from countries in the Latin America and Caribbean region since Sept. 19. Among them are children and unaccompanied minors, according to UNICEF, the United Nations division that aims to protect children worldwide. 

The returns — a mix of both repatriations and deportations — are sure to create additional stress on a country already dealing with multiple social, economic and political crises. Turmoil exacerbated by the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, an earthquake in August that impacted about 800,000 people in the southwest region and ongoing gang activity that has left hundreds dead and 20,000 displaced in the Port-au-Prince area alone.

To access this post, you must purchase Haitian Times' Subscription, Billed Yearly or Weekly Pass.

Larisa Karr

Larisa is a reporter for The Haitian Times covering politics, elections and education primarily. A graduate of the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, she has interned at CNBC and the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network. She is also a recipient of the 2021 DBEI Fellowship by Investigative Reporters & Editors. Larisa can be reached by email at larisa@haitiantimes.com or on Twitter @larisakarr.

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