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Profiles

Haitian-American Farmer Pursues Purpose in Light of the Immigrant Hustle

By Tarah-Lynn Saint-Elien

Twenty-five minutes outside of Portland and tucked into the urban West Hills, you’ll find a 15-acre vineyard and a black man with overalls and a wide smile, awaiting to greet you. 

Upon entering, you’ll hear The Notorious B.I.G. belting out “it was all a dream” or Jay Z thumping through the speakers. Looking around, you’d see paintings of family, Haitian art, fitted caps and cigars. Barrels and bottles fill the room and guests are speckled in the space – people of all races coming together to enjoy the music, the ambiance and most importantly, the wine. 

You’re at Abbey Creek Vineyard. And it is not your average winery. 

“It’s a hip-hop winery,” says Brooklyn-born owner and winemaker, Bertony Faustin. The first generation Haitian American first opened the winery in 2012. It wasn’t at all unusual for guests to be surprised he was the owner. Now, Faustin is known for being the first recorded black winemaker in Oregon.


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Oct. 22, 2019